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    Transplantation Ethics

    €36.25
    Although the history of organ transplant has its roots in ancient Christian mythology, it is only in the past fifty years that body parts from a dead person have successfully been procured and transplanted into a living person. This book offers a critical work on transplantation policies.
    ISBN: 9781626161672
    AuthorVeatch, Robert M.
    SubAuthor1Ross, Lainie F.
    Pub Date22/01/2015
    BindingPaperback
    Pages480
    AvailabilityUsually Delivered within 5 – 10 days
    EditionSecond Ed
    Availability: Out of Stock

    Although the history of organ transplant has its roots in ancient Christian mythology, it is only in the past fifty years that body parts from a dead person have successfully been procured and transplanted into a living person. After fourteen years, the three main issues that Robert Veatch first outlined in his seminal study Transplantation Ethics still remain: deciding when human beings are dead; deciding when it is ethical to procure organs; and deciding how to allocate organs, once procured. However, much has changed. Enormous strides have been made in immunosuppression. Alternatives to the donation model are debated much more openly - living donors are used more widely and hand and face transplants have become more common, raising issues of personal identity. In this second edition of Transplantation Ethics, coauthored by Lainie F Ross, transplant professionals and advocates will find a comprehensive update of this critical work on transplantation policies.

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    Although the history of organ transplant has its roots in ancient Christian mythology, it is only in the past fifty years that body parts from a dead person have successfully been procured and transplanted into a living person. After fourteen years, the three main issues that Robert Veatch first outlined in his seminal study Transplantation Ethics still remain: deciding when human beings are dead; deciding when it is ethical to procure organs; and deciding how to allocate organs, once procured. However, much has changed. Enormous strides have been made in immunosuppression. Alternatives to the donation model are debated much more openly - living donors are used more widely and hand and face transplants have become more common, raising issues of personal identity. In this second edition of Transplantation Ethics, coauthored by Lainie F Ross, transplant professionals and advocates will find a comprehensive update of this critical work on transplantation policies.