This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. It looks like cookies are disabled in your browser. To find out more about our cookie usage policy click here then to find out about changing your browser cookie settings click here (This link opens in a window).

This site requires cookies for account access and purchasing. You can review our use of cookies in our Cookie Policy, or Accept and Close this bar now.

Hard Local War

Hard Local War

A hard local war
Our Price: €23.81
ISBN/EAN9780752458823
AvailabilityDelivery usually within 5-10 working days
Publisher: The History Press Ltd
Pub. Date: March 1 2011
Author: Sheehan, William
Format: Hardback
Pages:256
Star Rating
Save to Wishlist

Following years of discontent over Home Rule and The Easter Rising, the deaths of two Royal Irish Constabulary policemen in Soloheadbeg at the hands of the IRA in 1919 signalled the outbreak of war in Ireland. The Irish War of Independence raged until a truce between the British Army and the IRA in 1921, historical consensus being that the conflict ended in military stalemate. In "A Hard Local War", William Sheeham sets out to prove that no such stalemate existed, and that both sides were continually innovative and adaptive. Using new research and previously unpublished archive material, he traces the experience of the British rank and file, their opinion of their opponents, the special forces created to fight in the Irish countryside, RAF involvement and the evolution of IRA reliance on IEDs and terrorism.Using new research and previously unpublished archive material, including the letters of British soldiers and IRA men, official reports and period publications, he also reveals that the British Army was in fact winning the fight in Cork, partly owing to superior resources, but also because of the cooperation of the local people. This book successfully challenges the received wisdom of the events and outcome of the War of Independence, and sheds new light on a tumultuous period of Irish history.
No recommended products at the moment.
No recommended products at the moment.